Corridor: From Latin: ‘To run’

The word comes from the Latin ‘currere’ which meant to run. This in itself was from the Proto-Indo-European (common ancestor of Indian and European language) ‘kers’; the Proto-Indo-Europeans had a much smaller vocabulary than modern languages, words were used to describe essential functions of human survival such as running. ‘Kers’ became ‘khouros’ in Greek and…

Blue – Originally meant ‘pale’

Blue – A colour intermediate between green and violet, as of the sky or sea on a sunny day. The word ‘Blue’ has been use in English since around the 1300s, though the spelling was slightly differnt (Bleu) the meaning was the same. ‘Bleu’ joined our language from Old French where it meant ‘pale’ and…

Apocalypse Cancelled

Apocalypse: Greek apokalyptein “uncover, disclose, reveal”. With the news of the day we thought an appropriate word would be ‘Apocalypse’. But the good news is, we don’t need to worry about an apocalypse. Sadly not because the end of the world is not nigh, but because that’s not actually what apocalypse means in its true…

Flea Market – Containing actual fleas

Flea market – A street market selling second-hand goods. The term ‘Flea market comes from the French ‘marché aux puces’, a name originally given to a market in Paris which specialized in shabby second-hand goods of the kind that might contain fleas. The earliest English use that the 20-volume Oxford English Dictionary has found dates…

Guacamole: From the Aztec for testicle soup

Guacamole has a rather interesting etymology; its origin dates back to the Aztec people of South America and was originally “ahuacamolli” (their language bearing many similarities to modern day Spanish), a combination of “ahuácatl”, meaning testicles and “Molli” meaning soup. The reason the word “ahuácatl” crops up here is because it was the Aztec people’s…

Twice – From the plural of dwo

Twice – Two times ‘Twice’ was once ‘twies’ in old English, and derives from the Proto-Germanic word ‘twiyes’ and originally from the Proto-Into-Eurpoean word ‘dwis’ which was the plural of ‘dwo’ meaning two.