Pie – Magpie like

  Pie – A baked dish of fruit, meat or vegetables, enclosed in pastry. A recent trend to call a dish with only a top made out of pastry, covering food within a serving dish, has been seen amongst gastropubs in the UK but, as @pieswithsides and others have pointed out, this does not fit…

History: Who’s story?

History – meaning stuff that happened in the past. No surprises, history is old, the word dates back to Proto-Indo-European (PIE), the common tongue of all modern Indian and European languages in around 3500 BCE. The PIE word it stems from is ‘Widtor’which is made up of two parts ‘wid’, actually a corruption of ‘weid’ meaning…

Cool: hip, but as old as language itself, Read more:

Cool: Cool is… well it’s cool. The usage of it to mean ‘fashionable’ or ‘good’ started in the early 1900s, but it’s etymology can be traced to way before that, in fact it has its root in the proto-Indo-Eurpoean culture. The etymology of ‘cool’ in this sense, entwines with the etymology of the word ‘cool’…

Ambivalence: German meaning ‘both strong’, Read more:

Ambivalence – We have the Swiss psychologist Eugen Bleule to thank for the word ambivalence. The word is a translation of the German word ‘Ambivalenz’, introduced by Bleule in 1910. He was combining two Latin words; ‘Ambi’ meaning ‘both’ and ‘valentia’ which meant ‘To be strong’. ‘Ambi’ comes from the Proto-Indo-European word ‘ambhi’ meaning all around. And ‘valentia’…